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  • You're going to yell at my son, and you expect me to just stand and watch?

  • You're going to yell at my son and expect me to stand there and watch?

In the second sentence there is no pronoun preceding expect, is it still grammatically correct? Can you provide a link where I can look into this?

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  • Yes, it's fine. The clause contains a coordination of verb phrases: "You're going to [yell at my son] and [expect me to [stand there] [and watch]?
    – BillJ
    Commented Sep 22, 2020 at 16:24

1 Answer 1

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They are both correct. We often drop the second subject pronoun in such structures. There is a subtle difference to my ears though.

You're going to yell at my son, and you expect me to just stand and watch

In this case the comma after son invites me to pause and then when I carry on my tone of voice would change into one of disbelief. I might carry on by saying You cannot be serious or something similar.

You're going to yell at my son and expect me to stand there and watch?

In this case I would read straight through and so the whole sentence would seem more neutral, I would just be reporting the facts of the situation.

I would therefore prefer the first one in this example but either is correct.

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