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Guard statements

They’re usually useful, but there are also cases where they make the code less readable or at least give nothing.

here goes an example

Guard statements

Usually, they’re useful, but there are also cases where they make the code less readable or at least give nothing.

here goes an example

As far as I know, to start a sentence with usually is usually not a good idea.

Is it acceptable to start a sentence with usually to achieve parallelism as shown in my second example?

To show it schematically:

  • The 1st version: Useful -- usually, sometimes -- useless.
  • The 2nd version: Usually -- useful, sometimes -- useless. The 2nd version provides a symmetry between "adverb" and "adjective" in each pair, the 1st one doesn't.

Which sentence you think is better?

1 Answer 1

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First I don't think there's anything wrong with starting a sentence with "usually".

Either of your structures is grammatical. The parallelism you see between "usually" and "sometimes" doesn't exist between "usually" and "there are also cases". Maybe your question didn't end up as you intended.

You could also use "... sometimes useful, but sometimes useless".

Instead of "give nothing", I suggest "add nothing".

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  • The parallelism you see between "usually" and "sometimes" doesn't exist between "usually" and "there are also cases". - But why?
    – john c. j.
    Commented Sep 24, 2020 at 19:06
  • 1
    While the meanings are similar, the number of words is different. One is a simple adverb, and one is an entire clause. For me, at least, there is no striking parallelism. Commented Sep 24, 2020 at 19:45

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