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In sometimes I use the multiple "to" in a single sentence. But I try to avoid this kind of sentence formation.

After eight years I again went to Chennai to join my first Job

Any simple solution for this kind of sentence formation?

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    There is nothing ungrammatical or even stylistically undesirable about using to twice in a sentence.
    – The Photon
    Commented Sep 29, 2020 at 20:51
  • oh I thought It was a mistake. thanks for the info @ThePhoton Commented Sep 29, 2020 at 21:04
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    Another preposition that may seem overused is for; e.g., "He went for a test for pulmonary function." It's grammatical and colloquial English. Commented Sep 29, 2020 at 21:16
  • Thanks for the guidance @DrMoishePippik Commented Sep 29, 2020 at 21:18
  • Maybe you could use: "... I again went to Chennai and joined my first job". it's almost like: "I go and see something", which is preferable to "I go to see something". Commented Sep 29, 2020 at 21:41

1 Answer 1

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Not for your sentence.

English follows a "head-body" pattern very often.

There's lots of situations where, if elements share the same "head", it only has to be specified once. Articles and prepositions are common "heads".

I took the black socks and blue socks from the shelf = I took the black socks and the blue socks from the shelf.

I wanted to see and talk to her = I wanted to see and to talk to her.

I went to the store and the park = I went to the store and to the park.

However. "to" as a spatial preposition in the targeting/destination/intent sense, and "to" as an infinitive marker, are completely different "heads" and can't be combined like that.

You can do this, though:

After eight years I again went to join my first Job at Chennai.

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