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I understand a bit of the Verb+Preposition combination to end a sentence. But the below sentence is kind of complex for me to understand. Can somebody make me clear how "in" is connected to "wants" and "direction"?

They seem enthusiastic and supportive of the new direction Betsy wants to take the program in.

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There is an implicit "that."

the new direction [that] Betsy wants to take the program in

That's still an awkward sentence even though grammatical.

It would be somewhat less awkward if the stylistic guidance (not a grammatical rule) that a preposition at the end of a sentence should be examined because the dangling preposition MAY not indicate clearly what is its object.

In my view, however, it is still awkward even when we eliminate the ending preposition.

the new direction in which Betsy wants to take the program

The fundamental problem to my mind is that there are just too many modifiers being placed on "direction." It is new. It involves the program. It is what Betsy wants.

In all probability, "program" would be unnecessary in context.

the new direction that Betsy wants to take

But if "program" is necessary, I'd make it clear that it is Betsy who wants a new direction.

the new direction that Betsy wants for the program

I am a bit hesitant about this answer because it involves style, which is not an objective aspect of language. Others may have a different opinion.

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