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During my first months on the job, Salinger remained a comfortably abstract concept. Then, in June, he called, anxious to speak to Phyllis Westberg, the company's president. My stomach lurched a little when I realized that it was Salinger, for real, on the other end of the phone.

As to the bold sentence above, I first interpreted it by regarding " anxious to speak to Phyllis Westberg" as a parenthesis elaborating on the emotional state of "he," and the main sentence is " he called the company's president."

But then I feel as if "the company's president" is an appositive of "Phyllis Westberg." While still " anxious to speak to Phyllis Westberg" is a parenthesis, the main sentence becomes " he called."

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    When Salinger telephoned, he was anxious to speak to Phyllis W. (who was the company's president). Oct 4, 2020 at 9:06

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Then, in June, he called, [anxious to speak to Phyllis Westberg, the company's president].

You are right that "the company's president" is a supplementary appositive.

The bracketed expression is an adjective phrase functioning as a predicative adjunct -- it is, more specifically, a supplement, detached by intonation or punctuation from the rest of the clause. It is nevertheless still predicative, in that it is related to a predicand, i.e. the referent of "he".

The meaning becomes clear if you compare it with the equivalent predicative complement in:

He was [anxious to speak to Phyllis Westberg, the company's president].

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