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I have seen in some grammar book the following pattern, which allows to place an adjective after a noun:

A shelf is empty.

➔ There is a shelf empty.

I want to know whether the above pattern is a general rule for the introductory there (if so, please also mention the reason because we do not have such a thing in similar structures; for example, we do not say "it is a book good") so that we can have similar examples like

"there is a man nice",

or it only applies to some certain class of adjectives (including "empty")?

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    It's definitely not a general rule - none of your examples except the one you quoted seem natural. The reasons are... complicated, and it doesn't seem like there's a single rule. Oct 5 '20 at 9:26
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    Note that A shelf is empty, the initial sentence, is grammatical; so is its transform, There is a shelf empty. But the sentence *A man is nice does not refer to a specific man, and therefore there-insertion can't apply to it. Oct 8 '20 at 22:37
  • @JohnLawler Thanks for your comment, which is in fact the answer to my post. So, if I understood correctly, when we attribute an adjective to a specific noun, for example, in the form of "a [noun] is [adjective]", we can always place the adjective after the noun in an introductory there structure, and this case is the only one in which an adjective follows a noun in an introductory there structure, right?
    – Later
    Oct 9 '20 at 13:29
  • ... , and this case is the only one in which a non-postpositive adjective follows a noun in an introductory there structure, right?
    – Later
    Oct 9 '20 at 13:39
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    @Later No, that's not what I meant, so you must have understood incorrectly. The adjective placement is a result of_there_-insertion, which moves the subject. The predicate adjective stays where it is. The point is that if the subject of a sentence is not a specific referent, then there-insertion can't apply, even if the clause meets the requirements otherwise. It has nothing to do with adjective placement. And I never mentioned all or only anything. Those are very dangerous words for syntacticians to use, and if you heard me saying them then you may not quote me. Oct 9 '20 at 15:19

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