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In the following sentence:

Simply put, the impacts of global warming are going to be more evident in not-too-distant future.

Can I use In layman's terms instead of simply put?

In layman's terms, the impacts of global warming are going to be more evident in not-too-distant future.

Which one is more formal and academic and which one is more likely to be used in speaking?

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    You can use it if you have previously been discussing the subject in highly technical language (that a 'layman' - a non-scientist - might not understand). Commented Oct 9, 2020 at 13:20
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    I think you should be careful about assuming that these two usages are "equivalent". To my mind, simply put implies potentially inaccurate simplifications. That's because the thing being described might be inherently complex, and thus incapable of being accurately represented in a "simple" way. But in layman's terms just means "avoiding jargon" (you could still communicate very complex concepts using just "layman's terms"). Commented Oct 9, 2020 at 14:41

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