0

We can use the structure “may/might have done” to talk about what was possible to happen or the past possibilities:

You might have left your cellphone at work. = Perhaps you have left your cellphone at work.

I wonder if we can use a similar structure for the past. For example:

I could not find my cellphone. I might had left it at work. = Perhaps I had left it at work.

I have just seen the first structure in my grammar textbook but not the second one. Can we use the structure “might had done”, like in the second example?

1
  • 1
    The second example needs the same tense as the first: "I might have left it at work" and "Perhaps I left it at work." – Weather Vane Oct 9 '20 at 18:19
3

The structure 'might had' is ungrammatical. If you are using a modal auxiliary verb (might, may, could, etc) to express something in the past, it has to be in the format have + past participle.

I might have passed the exam if I had studied a harder.
You might have said something that made him angry.
He may have been at the party, but I can't be sure.

2

may and might take the bare infinitive of the verb that follows

I may [to] go ---> I may go

I might [to] go ---> I might go

I may [to] have Covid 19 ---> I may have Covid 19

I might [to] have Covid 19 ---> I might have Covid 19

I may [to] have gone ---> I may have gone

I might [to] have gone ---> I might have gone


No English verbs have a simple-past infinitive

You can say "to say". You cannot say "to had".

I may [to] had gone ---> I may had gone.

I might [to] had gone ---> I might had gone

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.