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I do not want to accuse my teachers by their unknowledgeability and ignorance, because I'm as well as they and even worse. They uttered that word "immanent" is very rare and native speakers do not use it!

However, it's been for 5 years since school as my inventory includes this word, meaning that one quality or thing existing or inherent in object. For example:

To Kim always immanent verbiage, when she starts talking the things she has no clue.

or

The immanent beautyness of Mary makes this home unique.

Do these statements are well-known to you? Do you understand that Kim subjects to Verbosity and Mary's home is unique because she sparkling of beauty she born with it?

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    At first I wondered whether you had mis-spelled "imminent". I do not recall ever seeing or heard "immanent" being used and I had to look it up in a dictionary. So I would say it is uncommon in the UK.
    – AdrianHHH
    Oct 9, 2020 at 20:27
  • I’ve never seen “immanent” used in a way that wasn’t an obvious misspelling of “imminent”. Sometimes spell-check knows too many words.
    – StephenS
    Oct 9, 2020 at 22:34
  • Your teacher is right. Outside of some theologians, nobody will have heard of 'immanent'. Oct 10, 2020 at 7:52

2 Answers 2

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It isn't a common word. If you insert it into everyday conversation, people won't necessarily know what you mean, and they might think you're showing off.

The Oxford English Dictionary has three definitions of "immanent". The first is labelled "Chiefly Philosophy and Theology", the second "Philosophy", the third "in Kantian philosophy".

Lexico has two definitions for "immanent". One is purely theological. For the non-theological one, it gives 21 examples, all of which are from fairly formal, literary or scholarly sources.

In your sentence (although it doesn't quite make sense - perhaps you mean "Verbiage is immanent in Kim: she starts talking about things that she has no clue about"):

To Kim always immanent verbiage, when she starts talking the things she has no clue

it's fair to say there's a conflict in tone between the formal/literary/scholarly nature of the word "immanent" and the relatively colloquial expression "she has no clue" (although occasionally such contrasting tones are deliberately employed for humorous effect).

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  • From Oxford Dictionary of English, 3rd Edition © Oxford University Press 2010: adjective: existing or operating within; inherent... "the protection of liberties is immanent in constitutional arrangements"
    – Alex
    Oct 12, 2020 at 17:39
  • Sure, but using it as part of a discussion on the constitution is rather different from using it in a discussion about people's beauty, their personalities, etc. And even though most people here are intelligent people and reasonably au fait with constitutional discourse and with formal terminology, several native speakers have remarked that they wouldn't know what the term meant.
    – rjpond
    Oct 12, 2020 at 17:51
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I would not understand the examples. They are not correct English. The word "immanent" is rare. It should not be part of the normal vocabulary of an English Learner, until they have achieved a very high standard, and are discussing details of "the nature of God".

In philosophy, some believe that God is "immanent": He is part of the natural world. Some consider God is transcendental: He exists beyond the natural world.

God the Father is transcendental, but Jesus and the Holy Spirit are immanent.

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  • From Oxford Dictionary of English, 3rd Edition © Oxford University Press 2010: adjective: existing or operating within; inherent... "the protection of liberties is immanent in constitutional arrangements"
    – Alex
    Oct 12, 2020 at 17:40
  • Yes, it's a very rare word in all uses. Its the kind of thing that a Learned Judge would write
    – James K
    Oct 12, 2020 at 17:42

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