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I have found in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English 1 the following :

Send:affect:to make someone or something start to be in a particular state.
e.g. His lectures always send me to sleep.
Send sb/sth into sth
e.g. The tail broke apart, sending the plane into a dive.

I have found in English-Greek Dictionary of Fytrakis the following :

Send:affect:to make someone or something start to be in a particular state.
e.g.The fire sent everybody running out of the cinema.

I cannot create a link for that because English-Greek Dictionary of Fytrakis is not an online dictionary. Is the sentence "The fire sent everybody running out of the cinema" correct?

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  • Is English your mother language? Can I say 'The fire sent everybody to run out of the cinema ' or 'The fire is sending everybody to run out of the cinema now ' or 'The fire is sending everybody running out of the cinema now' or 'The fire will send everybody to run out of the cinema' or 'The fire will send everybody running out of the cinema'? Nov 17, 2020 at 10:20

1 Answer 1

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Yes, this sentence is correct and idiomatic.

The fire sent everybody running out of the cinema.

Another of your examples occurs, but is relatively less common:

His lectures always send me to sleep.

The phrase "put to sleep" is idiomatic, so it should be

His lectures always put me to sleep.

Following the comment below pointing out the occurrence of "send x to sleep" as well as "put x to sleep", I checked google ngram for the relative frequency of the two terms.
Google Ngram viewer put * to sleep, send * to sleep

Put is much more common, but send occurs as well, so it is idiomatic, but more than ten times less common.

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  • Put is more common, but I wouldn't say send is incorrect. Here's one dictionary that mentions it: macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/…
    – Justin
    Oct 14, 2020 at 14:42
  • Put to sleep suggests euthanasing an animal to me. Oct 14, 2020 at 16:10
  • @KateBunting Probably because that euphemism is based on the idiom. I think the idiom still stands in its own right as correct. Oct 14, 2020 at 16:49
  • @Justin Interesting. I checked google ngram on some expressions with different pronouns. "send" is more common by a factor of more than 10; but you're right, it's not incorrect. Oct 14, 2020 at 18:27
  • @gen-ℤreadytoperish Well, of course it is, but I meant that the phrase is most often used in that context (at least in the UK), so it sounds odd to use it of a person. Oct 15, 2020 at 7:34

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