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I have 2 sentences and I can't decide which one is syntactically correct:

"If you want to leave a comment all exam participants will see, click here"

"If you want to leave a comment for all participants to see, click here"

Please advise! Thank you!

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  • The first one does not flow, in the sense that I had to backtrack to understand it. The anticipated meaning was broken by the lack of a preposition. – Weather Vane Oct 15 '20 at 12:18
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The first option is improved by changing it to:

"If you want to leave a comment that all exam participants will (be able to) see, click here"

The second option sounds the point of the comment is for everyone to see it. The first one sounds more like a note or warning telling people that the comment is visible. But may not be for the sole puprose of being shown to everyone.

The addition of "be able to" changes the meaning slightly from meaning that the comment is likely to or definitely will be seen by everyone to meaning that the comment could be seen by people if they chose to look at/for it.

You can choose between the options based on the intended meaning. The difference is small however, so whichever one you choose will not sound wrong and will convey the general meaning well.

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  • Thank you very much for your response! So if I understand correctly, if the meaning is that the comment might be seen by all, if they choose to see it, I may use the second option with the addition of 'to be able'? "If you want to leave a comment for all participants to be able to see, click here". Is that correct? – Igal Oct 15 '20 at 14:45
  • The addition of 'to be able' in the second option doesn't really work. "For all to see" or "for all ___ to see" is a set phrase or idiom so adding to it sounds strange. For that meaning, I would use "If you want to leave a comment that all exam participants will be able to see, click here" – ededededed87 Oct 19 '20 at 8:57
  • Great! I see the difference now! Thank you very much for the explanation! – Igal Oct 19 '20 at 12:34

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