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I have the following sentence:

The result can be phrased as the statement that given an integer n the equation x^n = y has a solution.

I was wondering is it better to put a comma like "given an integer n, [...]" or keep it like this? Any comments are appreciated. Thank you.

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A single comma is used to separate clauses. I don't think this is two separate clauses. I think what you are trying to do is highlight a parenthetic statement, which would require two commas.

A parenthetic statement is one that can be enclosed in commas or brackets.

For example:

  • The result can be phrased as the statement that, given an integer n, the equation x^n = y has a solution.

  • The result can be phrased as the statement that (given an integer n) the equation x^n = y has a solution.

It should be possible to completely remove a parenthetic statement and the sentence would still make sense, which yours seems to:

  • The result can be phrased as the statement that the equation x^n = y has a solution.
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  • @DhanishthaGhosh This is an English grammar site. If you think a Maths textbook is wrong, find a mathematics site and ask them about terminology. – Astralbee Oct 19 '20 at 10:23
  • The statements are written in English even though it is a Mathematics textbook. Hence I pointed out. And OP's question does contain Math since there is exponential functions used. So I am guessing he is either asking this for his assignment/study related issues or might be for writing a research paper. – Dhanishtha Ghosh Oct 19 '20 at 11:11
  • @DhanishthaGhosh Yes in English, but each field of study has its own terminology. Terminology doesn't always follow the rules of English grammar, and often words or phrases have different meanings in different fields. The example I always give, as I work in the field of IT, is the word "unresolved" which has a very different meaning in ITIL terminology to its dictionary definition. I know my answer is correct grammatically, but if you see it written differently in a mathematics textbook you should talk to a mathemetician. – Astralbee Oct 19 '20 at 11:43
  • I understand. Thank you. – Dhanishtha Ghosh Oct 19 '20 at 11:58

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