1

Is the structure of the bold phrase in the following expression grammatically right?

In conclusion, having considered the aforementioned reasons and examples into account, I do believe that ... .

If it is right, what structure does " having considered ... Into account" follow?

If it is not true, what can be a perfect alternative for that?

4
  • 3
    The correct phrase is: having taken ...into account. (The use of aforementioned is very formal!) Commented Oct 24, 2020 at 11:42
  • @Ronald Sole , Thanks for the response. What is the problem of using "considered"?
    – Rwy5
    Commented Oct 24, 2020 at 11:48
  • Incidentally, the having clause is a supplementary adjunct. It doesn't modify anything but simply provides additional non-integrated content.
    – BillJ
    Commented Oct 24, 2020 at 12:00
  • 1
    It should be "having taken the aforementioned reasons and examples into account ...", or simply "having considered the aforementioned reasons and examples ..."
    – BillJ
    Commented Oct 24, 2020 at 12:06

1 Answer 1

14

There are two different adverbial expressions (with much the same meaning) being mashed together in OP's example...

1: Having considered the aforementioned reasons and examples, I think...
2: Having taken the aforementioned reasons and examples into account, I think...

Use one or the other (whichever appeals to you), not both.

3
  • 1
    "Use one or the other (whichever appeals to you), not both." Using both can be fine. "Having considered and taken into account the aforementioned reasons and examples, I think..."
    – nick012000
    Commented Oct 25, 2020 at 0:32
  • I suppose you're right (there are half-a-dozen written instances of "Having considered and taken into account" in Google Books). But even though I don't object to tautology in general, it seems a bit clunky in this particular case. And it's not an "established (legal) collocation" like aid and abet or cease and desist, so I still think it would be best for most native speakers and practically all non-native speakers to stick with the advice in the final sentence of my answer. Commented Oct 25, 2020 at 13:11
  • I suppose "having considered and taken into account" would contrast with "having considered and chosen to ignore", but that is not what the OP was about.
    – alephzero
    Commented Oct 25, 2020 at 13:32

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .