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Can anyone help me to find out why (A) structure is wrong and (B) is correct?

A. when disasters occur in local communities, it is the students who agree to help again and again.

B. when disasters occur in local communities, it is the students who have agreed to help again and again.

This is a test from English Grammar Digest by Trudy Aronson. Is it because of the meaning?

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    Who says (A) is wrong?
    – TypeIA
    Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 16:46
  • 2
    It's simply not true that Simple Present (A) is "wrong" and Present Perfect (B) is "correct". They're different syntactic constructions, which unavoidably must convey exactly the same meaning because of again [and again]. Without that qualifier, it would be possible to draw the distinction between A: Present used "timelessly", to signify that this is what always has and always will happen and B: Perfect form referring to a single Past action with particular relevance to time of speaking. Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 16:48
  • I’m voting to close this question because it's based on the false premise that one of the cited alternatives is "incorrect" Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 16:49
  • Do you mean both of them are correct? It’s a test from English Grammar Digest ( Trudy Aronson )
    – user124199
    Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 16:56
  • Yes, we are all saying A is perfectly correct.
    – mdewey
    Commented Oct 28, 2020 at 17:02

1 Answer 1

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Agree is a verb.

"I have agreed" - is a past participle tense of it, and it means, that "I have done the act of the agreement sometime ago, in the past, and it is active/valid up until now"; however I don't specify when that agreement took place.

"I agree" - is a "simple present tense" of it, and it means, that I agree, either in general, or in the specific moment.

Therefore, both A and B are correct, they just have slightly different meanings.

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