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As you are well aware, the intransitive verb "elaborate" is followed by the preposition "on". Accordingly, I would be appreciative if you do me a favor and let me know whether the preposition is required in the following sentence or not. If not, then why?

  • This point will be elaborated further in the next chapter. Source

Logically, the verb "elaborate" should take that preposition and I have no idea why the example has not been included by that?! To me the correct version of the example would be:

  • This point will be elaborated on further in the next chapter.

1 Answer 1

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elaborate, elaborate on

The transitive verb elaborate means to develop, produce or work out.

The working group gradually elaborated its plans for rebuilding the town centre. When the verb elaborate is used intransitively, it is followed by the preposition on. The phrasal verb elaborate on refers to providing more details about a matter or topic.

Ming offered a few tantalizing details but would not elaborate on the new venture.

BtB - Canada

"Elaborate" can be transitive or intransitive. The intransitive version requires "on".

If you elaborate something, you extend it or make it more complex. If you elaborate on something you discuss it in more detail.

Answer

On balance I prefer your version over the original.

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  • Therefore, the correct version would be "This point will be elaborated on in the next chapter."
    – A-friend
    Oct 30, 2020 at 16:24
  • It's difficult to say in this case. You could either say, "This point will be expanded ..." or, "This point will be discussed in more detail ...". Both make sense but my feeling is that the point (whatever it is) will be discussed in more detail in the next chapter - i.e. it will be elaborated on. I think we would have to know more about the point and more about the next chapter to be certain. Oct 30, 2020 at 16:31
  • I'm a bit confused now. May I ask you to elaborate on your point? What is exactly wrong with: "This point will be elaborated on in the next chapter." Is it a matter of using two prepositions "on" and "in" in a row?
    – A-friend
    Oct 30, 2020 at 16:34
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    @A-friend - There is nothing wrong with it or the number of prepositions. I'm just saying that someone could make a case for omitting the "on". I personally prefer "on" in this particular context. Oct 30, 2020 at 16:38

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