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It there a difference between these sentences?

It was always been my intention to play for for Team GB

vs

It has always been my intention to play for for Team GB

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  • Why do you have "for for" in both examples?
    – gotube
    Sep 12 at 0:22
  • What structure do you think "was been" is?
    – gotube
    Sep 12 at 0:23
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The “was been” option is ungrammatical, no two ways about it. You could grammatically say “It always was my intention.” The “has been” option is definitely grammatical.

A primary auxiliary verb consisting of a form of “be” coupled with a past participle indicates the passive voice of the verb specified by the past participle. Intransitive verbs like “be” have no passive voice.

A primary auxiliary verb consisting of a form of “have” coupled with a past participle indicates a perfect tense of the verb specified by the past participle. All verbs except modals have perfect tenses.

This is one of the most important rules of English grammar.

EDIT Yes, it is possible to have perfect tenses in the passive voice.

It has been thought about many times before.

is an example. Here two past participles are used. A form of “have” plus “been” plus the past participle of the verb with substantive meaning.

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It was always my intention to play for Team GB

This sentence uses past simple. It describes an intention that started a long time ago and finished before now. It would be appropriate if the speaker is currently playing for Team GB, so the period of intent is in the past.

It has always been my intention to play for Team GB

This sentence uses present perfect. It describes an intention that started a long time ago and is still current. It would be appropriate if the speaker is not yet playing for Team GB, or has only just been selected.

Note: I have corrected a couple of grammatical/typograhic errors in the two sentences

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