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On Fridays Mary goes to the supermarket by bike.

or

Mary goes to the supermarket by bike on Fridays.

And If I turn it into a question, can I say:

Does Mary go to the supermarket by bike on Fridays?

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  • They're all fine. – Ronald Sole Nov 6 '20 at 16:49
  • Note that you can also rearrange the sequence to On Fridays, does Mary go to the supermarket by bike? (syntactically valid, although it does slightly change the meaning). By you can't do this with By bike, does Mary go to the supermarket on Fridays? I can't say exactly why that last one is syntactically invalid, but I'm sure it is (mainly because it seems so much worse than simply being idiomatically out of favour). – FumbleFingers Nov 6 '20 at 17:36
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When you move an adverbial phrase to the beginning of the sentence, it should be followed by a comma: "On Fridays, Mary goes to the supermarket by bike."

The first two have slightly different emphases. If you ask "What does Mary do on Fridays?", the answer would likely be "On Fridays, Mary goes to the supermarket by bike." If you ask "When does Mary go to the supermarket by bike?" the answer would likely be "Mary goes to the market by bike on Fridays."

Your question form is correct.

Also, "by bike" sounds a bit awkward to me. "goes to the market on her bike" or "bikes to the market" would be more natural. Using "by bike" might be appropriate if you're distinguishing between different modes of transportation:

"On Mondays, Mary goes to the market by car. On Tuesdays, she goes by bus. On Wednesdays, she goes by foot. On Thursdays, she goes by train. On Fridays, she goes by bike."

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  • Thank you very much! – Ines Nov 6 '20 at 18:55

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