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  • What is the most suitable method of xxx for improving xxx?

or

  • What method of xxx is most suited to improve xxx?

or

  • What method of xxx is most suited for improving xxx?

Sorry for the xxx, but I'd rather keep it generic.

I used the second form, but I've been told that it's not properly constructed. Which form should I use?

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  • "Generic" is bad. Good questions are specific. Please put something in place of xxx. – James K Nov 8 '20 at 18:02
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Because you have not said why someone said that the second is not properly constructed, it is hard to answer your question.

method to improve

and

method for improving

are both grammatically acceptable.

EDIT: Based on a comment from the OP, I suspect that part of what was being asked was to discuss

What method of xxx is most suitable for improving yyy

What method of xxx is more suitable for improving yyy

The first sentence implies that there is more than one method, but does not imply that there are only two methods. The second sentence implies that there are exactly two methods. Both are grammatical, but they are not both applicable in the same context.

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  • ah, yeah, sorry. I was corrected on the construction of the question what is the most suitable method vs what method is more suited – Francesco Favro Nov 8 '20 at 20:37
  • That still does not tell me explicitly what the objection was, but I think I can guess. I'll address it in an edit to my answer. – Jeff Morrow Nov 8 '20 at 21:15

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