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I was wondering whether in the following scenario:

Harry: Then what did you tell him?
Larry: Nothing. I just kept quiet looking at his eyes. When he found out that he had made such that big mistake and he was at fault himself while he had put all the blame on me, he hung his head in shame and walked away.

we can substitute the bold phrase with *hung his head with embarrassment without any change in meaning. Also, I need to know whether the phrase "hand one's head with embarrassment" is an idiomatic phrasing or it sounds like a weird idiom to you.

Please kindly enlighten me.

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You can hang your head in shame or embarrassment - in fact, the dictionary definition of "hang head" says precisely that. When you say "without a change in meaning", obviously there is a difference between shame and embarrassment - a dictionary will tell you that. From a grammar point of view, they are interchangeable and are idiomatic. There are other reasons a person might lower or bow their head - for example, in respect.

Also, I note that your example uses the wrong pronoun. "One" is the indefinite pronoun - you use it when not referring to a specific person. In your example, Larry is talking about someone specific. You should use the possessive pronoun "his".

Larry: Nothing. I just kept quiet, looking at his eyes. When he found out that he had made such that big mistake and he was at fault himself while he had put all the blame on me, he hung his head in shame and walked away.

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  • Yes, I'm sorry for the typos @Astralbee. I'll edit my thread.
    – A-friend
    Nov 11, 2020 at 13:12
  • Just out of curiosity @Astralbee, do the phrases "he kept his head down and walked away" and "he hung his head and walked away" mean the same thing?
    – A-friend
    Nov 11, 2020 at 13:15
  • "He kept his head down as he walked away" would describe that position being held as he walked. Otherwise, not much difference.
    – Astralbee
    Nov 11, 2020 at 13:32
  • Could you possibly elaborate on it a little @Astralbee? It still sounds a bit foggy to me. May I know if usually how would a native explain this situation?
    – A-friend
    Nov 11, 2020 at 13:47
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    The way you said it is fine, although you should add "in shame" or "in embarrassment".
    – Astralbee
    Nov 11, 2020 at 13:58

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