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I was writing this sentence:

This is the id of the project to which the user is added to.

Pardon the technical jargon, I tried to convert the same sentence to something like this:

This is the drum to which this rum is going to be added to.

I can't put my finger on it but something seems odd about these sentences. Are these sentences really grammatically correct?

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    You can lose the final "to" in both sentences.
    – KillingTime
    Commented Nov 3, 2020 at 9:10
  • @KillingTime oh okay. The second "to" just rolls of the tongue better. Is there a rule that I can look up about this? I wanna read a little more about this.
    – scipsycho
    Commented Nov 3, 2020 at 10:14
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    The rule is don't double up the preposition. It's got to be either This is the id of the project to which the user is added OR This is the id of the project which the user is added to. Take your pick. Commented Nov 3, 2020 at 12:17
  • Blame it all on the passive voice that introduces such complications. Simpler: We added the user to this project ID. Commented Nov 3, 2020 at 12:38
  • "The user will be added to the project with this id." This may depend on exactly how you introduce the id earlier. In general, if you're wrestling with a sentence, try reversing it.
    – jimm101
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 0:44

1 Answer 1

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This is the id of the project to which the user is added to.

It is wrong (and sounds uneducated) because of the repeated "to".


You can say either of the following:

This is the id of the project to which the user is added.

or

This is the id of the project (that) the user is added to.

I prefer the first version, especially if this is formal documentation.

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