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Is it weird to add but after not going to lie?

  1. Not going to lie, but this week really flew by.

  2. Not going to lie; this week really flew by.

I have heard people use this phrase without but.

Is it ever appropriate to use but this way?

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Is it weird to add but after not going to lie?

Not going to lie, but this week really flew by.

Not going to lie; this week really flew by.

Logically it doesn't make sense but, in conversation, most native speakers wouldn't notice - they would just assume the intended meaning.

"I'm not lying" means "I am telling the truth". Thus for (1), we have the sentence, "I'm going to tell the truth, but this week really flew by." There is an illogic to this and it doesn't stand up to analysis. However, in conversation we don't tend to analyse deeply.

Conclusion: It makes better sense to omit the "but".

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The but isn't forbidden, however the first option which uses but

Not going to lie, but this week really flew by.

can mean something different:

  • [I am going to lie when I say] this week really flew by.
  • [I don't really mean this when I say] this week really flew by.

It's not definite in your context, but in this sentence

I am not being sexist, but I don't think men should do housework.

the speaker might be

  • trying to excuse himself for making a sexist remark

  • does not realise that he is making a sexist remark

  • knows it is a sexist remark, but does not believe he is sexist

So the way to say your sentence without doubt as to what you mean is #2

Not going to lie; this week really flew by.

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  • I don't see how your "sexism" example helps understanding. Surely the problem word is "lie" which has a negative aspect to it. I agree with your final conclusion though. Nov 16 '20 at 12:02
  • @chasly-supportsMonica I don't know what the speaker of the first sentence intended to say, and thought a different example would illustrate more clearly how but can be used. Nov 16 '20 at 12:09

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