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Could you please help me understand the two following sentences:

Try as I like to find the way,
I never can get back by day.

As you can imagine I do understand each word separately, however the phrase "Try as I like" is new to me and I can't find what it means precisely. In addition, "get back by day" is something odd too, what could it mean?

It is from a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson.

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    It is telling: No matter your efforts for finding a way, you will never get back (home) by the time there is sun in the sky (daylight). Try as I like can be thought as Try as much as I can or Try as I might. Nov 17, 2020 at 6:07

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The verse is called 'The Land of Nod', a poetic way of referring to the world of our dreams. The speaker says that, however much he would like to go back there in the daytime, he cannot - he can only get there at night.

(The Land of Nod is actually a mythical place mentioned in the Bible (Genesis 4: 16). The phrase came to be used of 'dreamland' because of the association of ideas with 'nodding off to sleep'.)

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This is an unusual deviation from the actual phrase of 'Try as one might' which is widely used for saying that someone is making a very great effort but still cannot do something. Source or Source

'get back by day' would describe the act of returning before the last light leaves the sky.

Try as I like to find the way,

I never can get back by day.

This means that, as much as I was trying to find a way to get back, there was no chance I would be getting back by sunset or till the time there is light in the sky.

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