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I ride a bicycle to or not to go to the school.

Is to or not to correct expression? I doubt joining two words which have not a lexical meaning but a grammatical meaning with a conjunction is possible as 'or' in 'I may or will play soccer' or in 'I am or was happy'.

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  • "to or not to" doesn't make sense. What are you trying to say? – Jack O'Flaherty Nov 21 '20 at 6:18
  • @Jack O'Flaherty I'm trying to join two words which have not a lexical meaning but a grammatical meaning with a conjunction as 'or' in 'I jump and or or play.' – anysome Nov 21 '20 at 6:23
  • @Jack O'Flaherty Or as in 'I may or shall come' – anysome Nov 21 '20 at 6:39
  • but the preposition "to" has a lexical meaning. – James K Nov 21 '20 at 9:05
  • @James K It is a infinitive mark. – anysome Nov 21 '20 at 9:08
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No, you can't say those things. You would have to say "I ride a bicycle, whether or not I am going to school", or simply "I ride my bicycle everywhere". Why bring school into it at all?

May or will and may or shall don't make sense. How can you be both uncertain and certain that you will do something?

It would be possible to say "I am - or I was - happy", implying that something has just happened to make you unhappy.

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  • Thank you, then, 'not' can't modify 'not' as in 'not not happy' regardless of a double negative? – anysome Nov 21 '20 at 9:46
  • What's wrong with 'not unhappy'? – Kate Bunting Nov 21 '20 at 9:50
  • No, not 'not unhappy', 'not not happy.' The first 'not' modifies the second 'not,' not 'happy.' – anysome Nov 21 '20 at 10:08
  • So what else do you think 'not not happy' means? It makes no sense whatever to me. – Kate Bunting Nov 21 '20 at 12:09

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