0

Having trouble with ellipsis. I want to say that at one point in time, there was not a lot of songs that we would label "tango" today, but that the very fact that there was not a lot makes "the songs that we would label tango today" worth investigating.

Is any of the following sentences correct?

"There was not a profusion of songs that would be labeled 'tango' today - which obviously makes those highly worth investigating"

"There was not a profusion of songs that would be labeled 'tango' today - which obviously make those that would highly worth investigating"

"There was not a profusion of songs that would be labeled 'tango' today - which obviously makes those that would be highly worth investigating"

Thanks a lot

0

The versions with "would" and "would be" are grammatical, but they aren't easy to read. It might be easier to make the reference with a word like "few":

There were few songs that we would label 'tango', and that makes those few worth investigating.

  • Thanks a lot, very clear answer. Your sentence is indeed easier to read but the context of my paragraph makes it difficult to skip my "there was not a profusion of". Would it be correct and slightly easier to read if I said "There was not a profusion of songs that would be labeled 'tango' today, and that makes the few that would worth investigating"? Thanks. – Miles Nov 21 '20 at 16:29
  • That sentence works, but it's not as easy to read. "Profusion" is more often used in a positive sense. I think "There were not many" or "There were few" might work better. – Jack O'Flaherty Nov 21 '20 at 17:01
  • OK. Great, thanks a lot for your clear advice! - Sorry, I can't upvote your answer, seems I haven't got enough points yet – Miles Nov 21 '20 at 17:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.