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From https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/not-so-much-sth-as-sth

I don't feel angry so much as sad. (1)

Question 1: Alluding to the sentence above and given that the structure of the afore mententioned phrase is "not so much" followed by "something", is the following correct:

I don't feel so much angry as sad. (2)

Edit:

Question 2: Referring to @chasly - supports Monica's answer, it seems that they differ by word order. Is one order preferred over the other?

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    Yes, [not] so much [as] in such contexts can come before the "diminished" adjective OR between that and the "augmented" attribute introduced by the as- clause. Note that the two words in the corresponding more than version may need to be split, so I feel sad more than angry becomes I feel more sad than angry when rephrased. Nov 25 '20 at 12:51
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I don't feel so much angry as sad.

Yes, this is correct.

Written in full, it would be, I don't feel so much angry as I feel sad


Edit in response to comment by @Cheng

I don't feel angry so much as sad

The long form of this is I don't feel angry so much as I feel sad - This differs in word order from the previously mentioned expanded sentence.

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  • Do you have any comments on: I don't feel angry so much as sad. (the first sentence)?
    – Cheng
    Nov 25 '20 at 11:31
  • @Cheng - Please can you say what sort of comments you are interested in? I've added one to the answer. Nov 25 '20 at 11:47
  • @ chasly - supports Monica Let me update my question to make it clearer. Sorry!
    – Cheng
    Nov 25 '20 at 12:45

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