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Say I graduated from university in 2002 and I got married in 2016. And I worked in a bank from 2002 to 2016.

We can use "from ... to ..." with the simple past tense, for example, "I worked in a bank from 2002 to 2016."

But I am not sure if we can use past perfect continuous with "from ... to ..." to emphasize the continuous progress of the action, for example, "I had been working in a bank from 2002 until 2016"

Also, Is it correct to say "I had been working in a bank since I left university until I I got married"?

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  • It sounds a little clunky.
    – Cascabel
    Oct 28 '20 at 19:00
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Both are used in relation to a fixed point in time (either now or a specific date).

When I got married in 2016, I had been working in a bank since leaving university.

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  • Can I change "when" to "until"? "Until I got married in 2016, I had been working in a bank since leaving university."
    – Tom
    Oct 28 '20 at 9:56
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    It doesn't feel quite right to use until and since in the same sentence. Oct 28 '20 at 15:49
  • "by the time" or "before" sounds better right. For example, "I had been working in a bank since leaving university by the time I got married"? Does it sound ok?
    – Tom
    Oct 29 '20 at 0:44
  • Possibly, if you move By the time I got married back to the beginning of the sentence. But it would be much more natural to say something like "After leaving university, I worked in a bank until I got married." Oct 29 '20 at 9:15

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