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In the expression John Doe's partner in jazz edification, is it clear that John Doe and his partner provide edification (to all others) ?

Or could it be understood that the partner provides edification to John Doe ?

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  • IMO your first interpretation is correct. A teacher-pupil relationship isn't usually called a partnership. Dec 3, 2020 at 10:55
  • Thanks a lot, that is also how I see it. The "IMO" makes me a bit unsure, though! Would you/other members confirm that I there is no (strong) risk of confusion in using this phrase? Thanks
    – Miles
    Dec 3, 2020 at 13:43
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    I put "IMO" in the lack of a broader context of what John Doe does, or who his partner is, but as said, a partner is not usually a teacher, although there might well be mutual sharing of experience and knowledge. In the phrase "John Doe's partner in crime" it is clear that they are in it together. To be clear, you could write "John Doe's mentor in jazz edification." Dec 3, 2020 at 13:55
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    Thanks, so if I get it right: John Doe's partner in jazz edification = the partner who helps John Doe edify the world and John Doe's mentor in jazz edification = the person who edifies John Doe
    – Miles
    Dec 3, 2020 at 14:17

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