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If there are 2 but there aren't 4, is 'half 4' valid phrase to express 2? Otherwise, is it valid only when there are 4?

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    it is not clear what you are asking. Why would anyone express a number less clearly than by simply stating it? Commented Dec 4, 2020 at 7:15

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The only case where a native speaker would say "half 4" would be talking about the time in British English, meaning "half an hour past four o'clock" (4:30).

You could say that two is "half of four," but this would never be used by a native speaker when counting. They'd just say "two." If you forgot the word "two," though, "half of four" would get your point across.

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It would be mathematically correct, but not common.

I have a joke clock with "numbers" written as √4 or 1221/111 but I'd never say "I have √4 children", except as a weird joke. Similarly I'd never say "I have half of 4 children."

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