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The connectivity of the pore network in the SiC/SiCN material is assumed to be very high since pyrolysis leads to a shrinkage of the matrix therefore leading to cracks throughout the matrix. In order to prove this assumption, a labeling of the objects in a smaller region of interest (1 x 1 x 0.5) mm3 of the binary volume is performed.

What does "binary volume" mean?

I can't find this notion at all. Maybe someone has assumptions what it can be?

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    Can you provide some context?
    – legatrix
    Dec 4, 2020 at 16:41
  • The connectivity of the pore network in the SiC/SiCN material is assumed to be very high since pyrolysis leads to a shrinkage of the matrix therefore leading to cracks througout the matrix. In order to prove this assumption, a labelling of the objects in a smaller region of interest (1 x 1 x 0.5) mm3 of the binary volume is performed. Dec 4, 2020 at 16:43
  • I would also like to ask about the second sentence as I've not really got what the author wanted to say. Dec 4, 2020 at 16:46
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    Here is my assumption: The author is interested in the real-world physical object shrinking. They label various points on the computational model of the object. They then run a simulation of whatever the relevant real-world processes are. They then check to see if the labelled points in the computational model are closer together.
    – legatrix
    Dec 4, 2020 at 16:51

1 Answer 1

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A binary volume is a 3D representation of something using binary digits. In this case, it sounds like a computational model of a real-world physical object, very common in neuroscience, materials science, engineering, and many other fields. Below I show you a (badly drawn) binary representation of a sphere in 2D. If you imagine this in 3D (so with 125 bits instead of 25), that would be a binary volume of the sphere.

00100
01110
01110
00100

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