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From time to time, I see this type of sentence:

Whatever/However/Whoever... + Clause

Whoever wrote this should win a prize.

But aren't we supposed to put the relative pronoun that (or other relative pronoun) here?

Whatever/However/Whoever... + that + clause

Whoever that wrote this should win a prize.

I think that I hear both types of sentences, too, but I don't know whether:

Only one of which is correct

or

Both are correct, but there's a rule for their usage.

I'll put some sentences here bellow as examples:

Choose whatever type of chocolate you'd like.

Choose whatever type of chocolate that you'd like

Tell me whichever time suits you best to speak of this issue.

Tell me whichever time that suits you best to speak of this issue.

Give this gift to whomever worked hardest in your point of view.

Give this gift to whomever that/who worked the hardest in your point of view

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  • What makes you think that we are supposed to insert the relative pronoun? – legatrix Dec 4 '20 at 19:27
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    Saying "to whomever who worked hardest" is not good, and "whichever time " is better as "what time". – Weather Vane Dec 4 '20 at 19:30
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    Yes, and I don't remember hearing anyone say 'whomever'. – Weather Vane Dec 5 '20 at 8:53
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    @JasonO'Neil I believe you'd hear "to whomever" no more than 1% of the time in speaking, and see it no more than 25% of the time in reading. Some languages do indeed insert a relative pronoun in this kind of structure; English does not. It just depends on the language. – legatrix Dec 5 '20 at 9:40
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    @legatrix Now I understand it, thank you. It is very nice of you to ask for my native language so that you could give me a clearer answer, but your second-to-last comment has already given me a clearer picture about the subject. But I really appreciate your kindness nevertheless. – Jason O'Neil Dec 9 '20 at 0:55

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