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Can I use appositive clause (in bold) in the following way:

The merits of technology should never be denied, that they eliminate the inconvenience of attending events in person, be it traffic congestions or clash in schedule.

I want to use a appositive clause to help explain what is the merits of technology, is this the acceptable way to do that?

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  • No, because clauses can't function as appositives; only noun phrases can.
    – BillJ
    Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 16:48

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I would think an appositive clause would follow a noun. As for your sentence I would reformulate it in this way:

The merits of technology in eliminating the inconvenience of attending events in person, be it traffic congestions or clash in schedule, should never be denied.

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  • appreciate your answer. One follow-up question is that does "the merits" count as a noun preceding the appositive clause, though seperated by other components of the main sentence? Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 13:49
  • no, not really. If you check the link I included in my answer, you will understand how appositions work. They usually follow the noun, immediately and commas are used before and after them. They are usually noun phrases.
    – fev
    Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 13:56
  • But clauses can't function as appositives; only noun phrases can.
    – BillJ
    Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 16:49
  • Yet I found this expression used here. But I understand what you mean. I am not very familiar with English grammar terms.
    – fev
    Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 16:57

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