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Still eight but almost nine, Lucy had made friends that summer with the O’Reillys’ dog. A big, frolicsome animal – half setter, half retriever – it had crept into the O’Reillys’ yard a month or so ago, having wandered from a deserted house – so Henry’s guess was – and been accepted after some hostility by the O’Reillys’ working dogs. Henry said it was a useless creature, Lucy’s papa that it was a nuisance, particularly the way it scrambled down the cliffs to offer its company to whoever might be on the strand. The O’Reillys had given the dog no name and would hardly have noticed – so Henry said – if it had wandered off again. When Lucy and her papa had their early-morning swim, her papa always sent it back when he saw it bounding over the shingle.

Does it mean: Lucy’s papa had said that it was a nuisance?

Or does it mean: the dog made trouble for Lucy’s papa?

Source: The Story Of Lucy Gault by William Trevor.

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Henry said it was a useless creature, Lucy’s papa that it was a nuisance.

This means that:

  • Henry said it was a useless creature
  • Lucy’s papa said that it was a nuisance

The word "said" is not required twice in this phrasing.

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