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Is the sentence The knife is a tool to cut grammatically correct?

My logic is that the sentence phrased thus doesn't convey the intended meaning as it seems to convey the opposite idea, i.e., The knife needs cutting, which, of course, is meaningless. My logic stems from the fact that to cut here is a gerundial infinitive acting as an adjective and modifying the noun phrase a tool. Thus, I suppose, the sentence might better be rephrased, among many possibilities, as The knife is a tool to cut [vegetables with.], or, The knife is a tool that cuts. [no object needed].

Is the original sentence correct or do I need to rephrase it to convey better the meaning?

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Yes, you need to rephrase it. As you say, it's fine if you add a mention of what is being cut, but on its own it is better expressed as

The knife is a tool for cutting.

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“The knife is a tool to cut” depends of how you view the sentence.

It could mean the knife is a tool which cuts an object.

It could also mean the knife is a tool which needs cutting.

It would be better to be more specific to reduce ambiguity.

Your logic is correct.

A better way to say it is “The knife is a tool which can cut”.

Or for example “The knife is a tool which can cut bread” if you want to be more specific.

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