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Is it correct to say?

I got burned 2 weeks ago and got scorch on my hand. It hadn't been getting better until 1 week had passed

should I use past perfect at the end or would simple past be more correct?

I got burned 2 weeks ago and got scorch on my hand. It hadn't been getting better until 1 week passed

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    It would be better to say It didn't start to get better until a week had passed (or simply for a week). Commented Dec 10, 2020 at 9:39
  • The answers both correct scorch (noun) to scorched (verb). The OP certainly needs correcting at this point, but (for completeness) you can also use the noun. If so, it needs an article: I got a scorch on my hand... Commented Jun 23 at 9:03

2 Answers 2

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“I got burned 2 weeks ago and got scorch on my hand. It hadn't been getting better until 1 week had passed”

A better way to say this: “I got burned 2 weeks ago and scorched my hand. It didn’t start to get better until a week had passed”

An alternative: “I had burnt my myself 2 weeks ago and scorched my hand. It didn’t start to get better until a week had passed”

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I got burned 2 weeks ago and got scorch on my hand. It hadn't been getting better until 1 week had passed

A proposed choice:

"I got burned 2 weeks ago and scorched my hand. It didn't start to get better for a week."

Why do we use this different wording? There is definitely a logical reason, however to a native speaker, one just sounds "better" than the other. To analyze a bit further: the "start" of a process is not continuous. It is more or less instantaneous. Thus, you would not use the past perfect continuous tense (had been) to describe a start.

Regarding scorch versus scorched: a Google Books Ngram search for "got scorch" shows 0 results. It's more common to use scorch in the verb form, where scorched is the past participle.

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