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I'm looking for an adverb which can be used in a certain situation.

is there any adverb i can use when i try to put a thing or someone in something else even though it is not properly fit? like which could be used both physically(literally) and figuratively.

in a figurative situation, for example, if a football manager put a player in a certain position which is not his original one with the manager's unilateral decision, what word is the best use for this situation?

"This manager put him in the position (adverb)."

i looked up a dictionary and found "forcefully" "by force" "against one's will".

for me, however, they seem to be specific to "physical" thing. like,

"This manager put a chair in the box forcefully."

what i'm looking for is the one/ones with more wide range of that meaning that i literally can use in any situation depends on context. Or could i just use "forcefully" "by force" "against one's will" these words? like,

"This manager put him in the position forcefully." (not literally by force but figuratively)

it's really hard to explain what i want to ask since i'm not a native English speaker but hope

it delivers clearly what i exactly want to ask. thank you for your time and hope you guys are having a great day.

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    It might be disappointing, but I think force and related words are the commonest solution here. For example, we talk of forcing a jigsaw puzzle piece into the wrong place. And I don't think you really need an adverb, because the verb force is equivalent (in your context) to put forcibly or put by force.
    – legatrix
    Dec 11 '20 at 17:03
  • @legatrix thanks for the comment! so i assume, if i want to use an adverb related to force or something like that in a sentence, i could use "forcefully" with not a dictionary meaning but a figurative one right?
    – pheno8
    Dec 11 '20 at 23:08
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    Definitely. In fact, I would challenge you to find a literal use of forcefully. It is very often used figuratively.
    – legatrix
    Dec 11 '20 at 23:50
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As mentioned in the comments,

"And I don't think you really need an adverb, because the verb force is equivalent (in your context) to put forcibly or put by force."

Thus,

"The manager forced him into the position."

It will be better if either the preceding or following sentence goes into more detail.

"Joe did not want to play defense. The manager forced him into the position."

or

"The manager forced him into the position, even though it wasn't a good fit for his abilities."

Regarding your example,

"This manager put him in the position forcefully."

In my opinion, this doesn't sound right. For this case, you are probably forced to use forced instead of forcefully.

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