1

In a translation, I came across this sentence:

This is precisely why he loosened the restrictions, for those who are weak.

I don't know why, but in my mind, after the expression This is why followed by a comma, I expect a to phrase to begin:

This is why I came, to help you with your dissertation.

Is the first sentence I gave correct or does it sound strange at all?

2 Answers 2

1

Your original

This is precisely why he loosened the restrictions, for those who are weak.

is fine but I think I would have added extra words for clarification

This is precisely why he loosened the restrictions, for the benefit of those who are weak.

You are right though that it definitely needs the comma.

0

The word "to" is a preposition despite the fact that in your example it's being used as an auxiliary word for an infinitive verb tense. The word "for" is also a preposition, so I don't see a problem with the words used. What I do see wrong with that sentence is that it should use a colon instead of a comma.

Using a colon gives you basically the equivalent of an itemized list with only one item, and that doesn't require a verb.

Using a comma makes the sentence sound like "those who are weak" needs a verb to support it as the subject of the phrase and that it should say something like, "This is precisely why he loosened the restrictions, for those who are weak will now have a chance to participate."

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .