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I want to know the following sentences are possible.

[Context]

My mother is going to give a present for me. And I know what it is. It is a toy. In that case, can I say something as below?

This toy is what I know it is.

This toy is the thing which I know it is.

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  • No. Neither of those is idiomatic. I might say, “I know what you got me.” Or “I know you got me a toy” But the smart thing to do is act surprised and delighted when she gives it to you. – Jim Dec 10 '20 at 3:43
  • Hi,@Jim This toy is what I know it is. / This toy the thing which I know it is, are they wrong by themselves? – Tae-Bbong-E Dec 10 '20 at 4:38
  • Those sentences are very convoluted. – Jim Dec 10 '20 at 5:01
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    Side note: as written, the mother is giving the toy on behalf of the speaker, not to the speaker. – Lawrence Dec 10 '20 at 5:39
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Judging by the phrasing in the question, this may not be your first language. Neither of the two options provided make complete sense, and sound a little odd. You could say: "I know what the present is; it is a toy" or "I know the present is a toy" or "The present is a toy and I know it" I'm not really getting what concept you're trying for.

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  • Hi, This toy is what I know it is. / This toy the thing which I know it is, are they wrong by itself? – Tae-Bbong-E Dec 10 '20 at 4:37
  • If you are trying to say that you already know what the present is, they don't make sense. You would begin a sentence with "This toy..." if you were looking at it or showing it to someone else. Jacob's suggestions are much more natural. – Kate Bunting Dec 10 '20 at 9:20

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