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Somethings confused me. I think i didn't understand something. When I translated 1. and 2. sentences, I saw passive voice(doing by someone). But I translated third sentence I didn't saw passive voice this time. Is these are passive voice or not?

1- They are bited.
2- Robots are controlled.

All verbs which I used in here can be transitive and intransitive. But why these are isn't passive?

3- They are worked.(I mean, by employers)

BotIf all uses are wrong how can I correct these are? By adding end of the sentences "by someone"? I hope I explained.

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Some verbs have both transitive and intransitive meanings, but only transitive senses can be made passive.

Example 1 uses an incorrect verb form. It should have "bitten", the irregular past participle of "bite". Apart from that, all three of your examples are passive.

They are unusual expressions, though, and they would be less strange if you add "by someone", as you suggest, to explain what they could mean.

Example 3 is especially strange because it is hard to understand why one would say it, but it would be reasonable to say, for example,
"They are worked hard by their employers."
That would be passive for "Their employers work them hard."

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  • Thanks for your answer. Actually "workers were employed by employers" that what I meant. Does that still mean your last sentence?
    – user123960
    Dec 17 '20 at 9:01
  • That's a different question. It is redundant to say "employed by employers". You could say "Workers were hired by employers." Dec 17 '20 at 9:05
  • Think like "A program ran by user". How can I explain i don't know. I mean there is a workers. And these workers worked by boss. There is a boss. Boss said "do work" to workers. So them all constanly working because their boss said "work". I am trying to mean that.
    – user123960
    Dec 17 '20 at 9:20
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    That would be said simply by 'Their boss made them work.", not by a passive. (Note that the past participle of "ran" is "run". Dec 17 '20 at 15:19
  • Thanks. I get it.
    – user123960
    Dec 18 '20 at 6:11

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