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I was wondering whether either one of the sentences below:

a. I'm done with you.
b. I'm through with you.

can be used in AmE to imply: "our relationship is over" for the speaker. If no, then I wonder how they differ semantically?

I have read the similar thread What is the difference between “I am done” and “I am through”?, but while it was it was not helpful at all, though I think the poster's question was absolutely clear.

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They are mostly interchangeable, however, I can come up with the nuances (only my opinion based on words definition):

  • be through with implies position. So when you say I'm through with you. that means that you have eventually moved from beginning of the relationship to the end of it. You are completely finished with something.

  • be done with implies the end of action. You may be simply finished with something, possibly for the time being. So I'm done with you. for me is not so judgemental and means a pause, not a finality. For example, you can say I'm done with you. during a quarrel and after time make it up with that person.

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  • In Britain, despite influence on our language from the US over many years, I still don't hear people saying "I'm through with X". We are much more likely to say "I'm finished with X" – chasly - supports Monica Dec 19 '20 at 17:20
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In Britain, despite influence on our language from US movies and TV over many years, I still don't hear people saying "I'm through with X". We are much more likely to say "I'm finished with X"

We understand "through" in that sense when we hear it, but use it differently. For example in a talent show such as Britain's Got Talent, "You're through!", does not mean the end of the road for a contestant. It means that that they have succeeded in getting through to the next round of the competition. This makes them happy, not sad.

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