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Does the phrase "efficient work of employees" sound natural? For example:

The main goal of his activities is ensuring efficient work of company employees.

Is it better to say "efficient working of employees"?

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I would say

The main goal of his activities is to ensure the efficient work of company employees.

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There is nothing wrong with the phrase "efficient work of employees" but it does seem a trifle awkward. I would rephrase this as:

The main goal of his activities is to ensure that company employees work efficiently.

This puts the emphasis on the employees rather than on the work they do. Also, using the form "ensuring" as the object of "the main goal is" i9s not ideal. The infinitive works better in this construction.

There are, of course, many other possible ways to phrase this general idea. Possibilities would include:

  • The main goal of his activities is to ensure that the work of company employees is performed efficiently.

  • The main goal of his activities is to ensure that employees have all the necessary tools, skills, convenient environment and facilities to work efficiently.

  • The main goal of his activities is to support the efficiency of company activities.

It is largely a matter of style and emphasis, and exactly what one wants to communicate.

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  • Thank you! I earlier rejected the phrase 'ensure that employees work efficiently' because it may sound like the focus is on 'employees', like a micromanagement or even like 'ensure employees work hard enough'. I'd like to make the phrase sound like 'ensure employees have all the necessary tools, skills, convenient environment and facilities'.
    – Daniel
    Dec 17 '20 at 16:24
  • The phrase 'efficient work of employees' seems to be less focused on people.
    – Daniel
    Dec 17 '20 at 16:36
  • @Daniel I have added some alternatives based on the comments. Dec 17 '20 at 16:45
  • Thank you, @David. Could please you also elaborate a bit on why the phrase 'efficient work of employees' is awkward.
    – Daniel
    Dec 17 '20 at 17:29

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