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I'm feeling nostalgic as I pen these words to you.

I'm feeling nostalgic as I am penning these words to you.

I feel that the first sentence is correct. Could you point out which sentence is correct and why?

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  • @fev— Are these sentences both correct, by the way? :)
    – user40475
    Dec 18 '20 at 11:29
  • @user405662: If you need to ask a question, do not post it as a comment. If you know the answer, please post it!
    – fev
    Dec 18 '20 at 11:31
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The meaning is different


I'm feeling nostalgic as I pen these words to you.

In this sentence the word "as" means "at the same time" and indicates that the two things are happening concurrently.

As as a conjunction The conjunction as has several different meanings. We use as when one event happens while another is in progress (‘during the time that’). In this case the verb after is often in the continuous form: … https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/as


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I'm feeling nostalgic as I am penning these words to you.

In this case you can interpret "as" to mean "because", i.e.

I'm feeling nostalgic because I am penning these words to you.

because: As it was getting late, I decided to book into a hotel. You can go first as you're the oldest. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/as


Note Because the word "as" has so many meanings, it is best to avoid its use if the is any possibilty of ambiguity.

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It is clear from the present ngram that the second choice is quite rare. In fact, it seems that I never found it. However, there is no indication in OALD that this verb should not be used in the continuous tenses; moreover, you'll find on this page an important number of uses in a continuous tense in the 19th century and also in the 21st, and therefore it seems that there is no reason to hesitate using "pen" that way, provided one is not too squeamish at the idea of using rather rare forms.

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