1

Let's consider two phrases below:

  • What makes an effective manager
  • What is project management

They both have the same grammar structure: what + verb + noun.

The first phrase can either be a question

  • What makes an effective manager?

or a noun phrase

  • What makes an effective manager is planning skills.

The second phrase can be a question too

  • What is project management?

But how do I make it be a noun phrase, similar to the first phrase's noun phrase?

Applying the same pattern gives

  • What is project management is the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project's objectives.

but I suppose that this sentence is grammatically incorrect.

4
  • 1
    'What is project management [and what isn't] is open to debate' / ' "What is project management?" is a question we need to address.' Dec 21, 2020 at 19:17
  • No: it's not correct. You need the awful "What project management is is the application ..."
    – BillJ
    Dec 21, 2020 at 19:28
  • @BillJ Why did you change the words order from 'What is project management' to 'What project management is' ? (You don't change it in the first phrase.).
    – Daniel
    Dec 22, 2020 at 12:14
  • 1
    What project management is, is the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project's objectives.
    – Lambie
    Jul 23, 2022 at 0:07

3 Answers 3

0

You could say this. However, it needs to be either the project's objectives or project objectives.

What is project management but the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project objectives.

It might sound better if it also began with For:

For what is project management but the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project objectives.

-1

You could force it and say

That which a project management is, consists of the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project's objectives.

But this is a rather intricate way of putting things. I would simply say

Project management consists of the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project's objectives.

1
  • Thank you, but this is a grammar question, not a phrase-request question.
    – Daniel
    Dec 22, 2020 at 12:15
-1

You can put the second example in two ways. You can either make it a noun phrase or a noun clause. For example,

What project management is the application of methods, skills, and knowledge to achieve a project's objectives.

Here the bolded part is a phrase that is the subject of the sentence. (It can be substituted with a pronoun as in the case of every noun phrase as in "It is the application of methods, skills...)

Alternatively, you can keep it as a noun clause by introducing a finite verb in the noun phrase after 'what.' The 'is' in your example is the finite verb to make it a clause. So the full sentence will be:

What is project management [noun clause] is [link verb] the application of methods, skills, and knowledge to achieve a project's objectives [subject complement]. Here also the noun clause can be replaced by a pronoun.


An example of a noun clause similar to yours with linking verb "is':

"What she wants[noun clause] is [link verb] fine with me [subj complement]." If you want to keep it as a phrase, change it to "Her wish[noun phrase] is fine with me". Both can be substituted with "It is fine with me."

Hope that helps!

6
  • -1 "What is project management" is not 'noun clause'. The sentence "What is project management is the application of methods" is ungrammatical. Your other examples are wrong, too.
    – BillJ
    Jan 28 at 8:39
  • Here are some examples of wh-clause from other writers: "I knew that Jorge was happy, and I thought I knew what was on his mind." (Colm Toibin, The Story of the Night. Scribner, 1996) thoughtco.com/wh-clause-grammar-1692498
    – brp7
    Jan 28 at 9:06
  • I would give more weightage to Edwin Ashworth who said it is in the other answer by looking at the quality of his answers. Being a native speaker is one thing. Knowing grammar is another. Your -2 is not going to affect me badly as I am not here for points. I don't see a way of blocking people in this forum.
    – brp7
    Jan 28 at 9:09
  • In "I knew that Jorge was happy, and I thought I knew [what was on his mind]", the wh- clause is a subordinate interrogative clause (embedded question) functioning as complement of "knew".
    – BillJ
    Jan 28 at 9:15
  • I see that you have said the same under the other guy's answer. Please go through the web for the basics. Here it is: What is a Noun Clause? A noun clause is a dependent clause that takes the place of any noun in the sentence, whether they are subjects, objects, or subject complements. For example: She was saddened by WHAT SHE HAD READ. In the sentence above, the noun clause "what she had read" is being used as the object of the preposition by. WH clauses are noun clauses is a very basic thing. I would request you to ignore my questions and answers.
    – brp7
    Jan 28 at 9:24

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