1

Let's consider two phrases below:

  • What makes an effective manager
  • What is project management

They both have the same grammar structure: what + verb + noun.

The first phrase can either be a question

  • What makes an effective manager?

or a noun phrase

  • What makes an effective manager is planning skills.

The second phrase can be a question too

  • What is project management?

But how do I make it be a noun phrase, similar to the first phrase's noun phrase?

Applying the same pattern gives

  • What is project management is the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project's objectives.

but I suppose that this sentence is grammatically incorrect.

3
  • 'What is project management [and what isn't] is open to debate' / ' "What is project management?" is a question we need to address.' – Edwin Ashworth Dec 21 '20 at 19:17
  • No: it's not correct. You need the awful "What project management is is the application ..." – BillJ Dec 21 '20 at 19:28
  • @BillJ Why did you change the words order from 'What is project management' to 'What project management is' ? (You don't change it in the first phrase.). – Daniel Dec 22 '20 at 12:14
0

You could force it and say

That which a project management is, consists of the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project's objectives.

But this is a rather intricate way of putting things. I would simply say

Project management consists of the application of methods, skills and knowledge to achieve project's objectives.

1
  • Thank you, but this is a grammar question, not a phrase-request question. – Daniel Dec 22 '20 at 12:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.