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It has been said that everyone lives by selling something.

Can I substitute the bold part with "it is said"?

I think since it is kinda like a saying, using present simple is more appropriate. But I also feel "it is said" can also mean this sentence was said before, and the impact on the present is that now people generally accept that.

And present perfect I think carry the implication that people now may or may not say this anymore.

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    Your ELU post has been closed and migrated to ELL where you already have asked the same question. Please note you shouldn't cross-post on both ELL and ELU. You can choose to ask on one of the sites depending on the question, but cross-posting is against the rules. This also remains true of all StackExchange sites. Do not post on multiple sites. You can request to migrate your post to a different site if you think that site is better suited.
    – Eddie Kal
    Dec 24 '20 at 2:21
  • May I ask how can I migrate my post? Dec 24 '20 at 3:47
  • Flag your own post and request a migration. The moderators can migrate your post for you.
    – Eddie Kal
    Dec 24 '20 at 3:48
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The difference is the difference between the past tense and the present tense:

It has been said that everyone lives by selling something.

At least one person, or possibly more, at sometime in the past, has already said that everyone lives by selling something.

It is said that everyone lives by selling something.

Numerous people currently say that everyone lives by selling something.

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It has been said that everyone lives by selling something.

Emphasis is on the fact that this sentence (everyone lives by selling something) has been said BEFORE, and its impact on the present is considered. So reference is made to cases when this sentence has been said before the moment of speech (although one may argue that it includes the moment of speech).

It is said that everyone lives by selling something.

rather means that "It is generally accepted that..."

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  • appreciate your answer, now I have doubt that "it is said" can also mean this sentence was said before, and the impact on the present is that now people generally accept that. Dec 22 '20 at 13:09
  • I did not realize this comment was a question. Can you formulate it more clearly?
    – fev
    Dec 23 '20 at 12:02
  • Present perfect is a tense used to refer to the impact of a past action on the present. Simple present is used to refer to a state of facts in the present.
    – fev
    Dec 23 '20 at 12:03
  • @Phantomwagerwallowgiltopus Questions go in the original post, not tagged in comments. Visitors will look at the question and at the answers. Few have the inclination to read litanies
    – Mari-Lou A
    Dec 23 '20 at 20:43
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This is a difference in nuance.

"It's been said" implies something that came up at some point in time, that may have been mentioned by one person or a few people. The subject would come from the speaker's own circle.

"It is said" is more general, a convention or an opinion shared by a larger group. This form refers to a subject outside the speaker's circle. Like "They say...", where "They" is the general, undefined "they".

Additional notes:

  • How small or large each group is, depends on the context.
  • Both may not be true of the said thing, but are the interpretation of the speaker.
  • Nobody would judge the choice of either one as wrong in whatever context.
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    What does speaker's own bubble mean, by the way? Appears to me a weird turn of phrase.
    – user40475
    Dec 23 '20 at 9:55
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    @user405662 I see it was edited to speaker's own circle, which is what I meant. Everybody lives in their own 'bubble'. I hear/read this a lot.
    – exastris
    Dec 23 '20 at 14:27

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