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Common here is All yours. But I'm not sure whether or not it's practiced internationally. Which one is better? Or all are okay? Any grammatical error?

I am strictly talking about the scenario wherein using these phrases should only mean that the possessor is allowed to do anything to what is given to them. Kindly do not come up with other cases where the possibilities of using these phrases increases or brings perplexity.

One of the scenarios:

"Listen, the sales are down and in coming days, the situation will go from bad to worse. And I don't want this to happen to our company. It is for this reason, I'm appointing you as the manager of this region. You need to work harder for this."

"Okay. But then I need some structural changes. Also, the way field workers work here is not a professional way. And..."

"Ah, whatever. You are free to do anything. It's all yours."

Note: Instead of uttering the last sentence, I may do some gesture spreading my arms and say, "All yours." to avoid "It's."

Further interesting is if I am talking about some workers (say field guys) here.

"I know the issue of field workers. In interest of the company, you can treat them the way you want. They are all yours/They are yours/All they are yours/Everybody is yours"

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    It's all yours holds good internationally. And regarding the Field workers sentence, I would go with " They are all yours " or " They are yours ". I am not sure about " All they are yours " (*head scratching). I definitely would not go with " Everybody/Everyone is yours" – NANDAGOPAL Jun 26 '14 at 14:02
  • Your examples all make sense except for "all they are yours" - this is incorrect. It would be "they are all yours" or "all of them are yours." – mc01 Jun 26 '14 at 15:44
  • "All yours" is generally used when indicating that control/possession of something is being given, but the phrase generally doesn't carry the idea that the thing is "yours to do with whatever you wish." Any restrictions on use or expectations for use prior to the transfer will remain. – wordsmythe Jul 17 '14 at 17:05
  • I'm not sure you really mean "yours to do with whatever you wish". Temporary assignment of control of a business department or a ship, for example, would include an expectation of maintaining the principle-agent relationship and continued responsible action. On the other hand, a car salesman might hand someone the keys to the car after the purchase has been made and say, "she's all yours", and that truly means "yours to do with whatever you wish"; same for any legal transfer of property. – CoolHandLouis Jul 17 '14 at 23:12
  • Also, "all yours" is often said when transferring control of a boat, allowing someone hold controls to a game console, etc. Are you interested in that scenario as well? – CoolHandLouis Jul 17 '14 at 23:13
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The expression that sounds better to me to express decision-making in this context would be:

Ah, whatever. You are free to do anything. It's up to you.

Because that way you are telling someone you want him/her to decide about something, which would be the same as: "The decision is yours". For me this is the big difference compared with the "* all yours" expressions which don't necessary imply decision making.

Usually "(*) All yours" is used to express the availability of someone or something in an informal way:

A: Can I borrow that book?
B: Sure, it's all yours.

A: I'd really need your help this afternoon if you're free.
B: I've got a meeting at 2, but after that I'm all yours.

Or to tell that something now belongs to someone:

The course requires you to pay the fee only one time and after that it is all yours.

In your last example, it seems right to use "They're all yours" (at least for me, the other options don't sound natural) because the workers could be treated "as someone wants", that could be interpreted as them losing some of their rights as humans and "taking them as objects". I've found a similar use in this book, but with girls instead of workers.

Extra (related with some previous comments on the question): "It's all in your hands" is more like "it's down to you". These expressions are used when for some reason you're the only one who could take that task at that moment. See this

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"It's all yours" is what you say when handing over responsibility.

Pilot, leaving flight deck of a 737 to co-pilot,

"It's all yours."

Conference host, handing over the lectern to a guest speaker,

"They're all yours."

-And that's pretty much the context for the phrase, "it's all yours."

"I am strictly talking about the scenario wherein using these phrases should only mean that the possessor is allowed to do anything to what is given to them."

I would feel very uncomfortable about saying "It's all yours" in order to convey that meaning.

I might say, rather' "The choice is yours."

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More colloquial would be:

"It's all in your hands"

or

"You have carte blanche to do you you feel best."

Strangely, you can use the French phrase in colloquial English!

  • Not exactly! It's all in your hands sounds like a request and not something that's spoken to mean that all the authority is granted. Consider the CEO requesting that manager-to-be ... "Please save this company, it's all in your hands!* – Maulik V Jun 26 '14 at 11:44
  • I agree..... "Please save this company, its' in your hands now. is a slight improvement ........like the doctors saying: "We have done all we can do - he is in God's hands now." – Gary's Student Jun 26 '14 at 11:50
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    No, Maulik V is right, there is a subtle difference between " it is all yours" and " it is all in your hands". It is all yours means - I have given it to you, and you can do whatever you can with it on the other hand " It is all in your hands" would mean - I am incapable of doing anything further, only you can do it. When the CEO says, it is all yours, he means " Hey Manager dude, I have given this team of people to you. You can do anything you want with them. change roles, fire, I don't care, just get the job done.". If the CEO said " It is all in your hands" it is like " I am useless " contd – NANDAGOPAL Jun 26 '14 at 13:59
  • If the CEO said " It is all in your hands" it is like " I cant do anything more, the whole company is yours, please save us!" which is absurd (at least if I were the CEO) and that is what Maulik is trying to say. – NANDAGOPAL Jun 26 '14 at 14:00
  • @NANDAGOPAL ........I see what you mean. – Gary's Student Jun 26 '14 at 14:01
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'All Yours' Vs. 'All is Yours' Vs. 'Everything is Yours'

All yours is by far the most standard of the three, especially with the hand gesture you've mentioned. It also does hold up internationally. The other two are decidedly formal and uncommon, and all is yours strikes me as archaic sounding. All of them are grammatically correct and essentially semantically equivalent, however.

If I were to nitpick semantics, I'd call out everything is yours as slightly different from all [is] yours. All might mean everything, or it might mean entirely; thus all yours could convey this one particular thing is entirely yours but everything is yours cannot carry that meaning. In colloquial conversation this is a non-issue as people will generally understand your intent.

"I know the issue of field workers. In interest of the company, you can treat them the way you want. They are all yours/They are yours/All they are yours/Everybody is yours"

  • They're all yours - this would be my choice, and I would definitely use the contracted form. This is already an informal response, and the contraction flows better while also de-emphasizing the possession. This is the idiomatic and natural thing to say.
  • They are yours - to me, this conveys the sense of possession too strongly. You don't own the workers (I assume they're not slaves); you're free to manage them as you see fit.
  • All they are yours - this is ungrammatical. You can amend it to all of them are yours, but this has an even more pronounced version of the second phrase's problem.
  • Everybody is yours - once again this sounds too literally possessive.

I'd also like to agree with the remarks in the question's comments. These phrases are used to express you're in control, which does not necessarily mean you may do anything you want. Given that subtle difference and this statement:

I am strictly talking about the scenario wherein using these phrases should only mean that the possessor is allowed to do anything to what is given to them.

I am forced to say that you shouldn't use any of these, because you strictly want to say that the recipient may do whatsoever they wish. For this sense, I suggest one of the following (in descending order of preference):

  • Do whatever you want
  • Everything is entirely up to you
  • You own all of it

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