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I don’t know why there is the word “met” in this sentence:

"But as always, he did check it met with our approval too."

What pattern or structure is it?

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    @lee A comma there looks wrong to me, a native speaker. It makes the "it met ..." a run-on sentence. "it met" is directly consequential to "check" and putting a comma there separates it off so that is no longer the case. Then it reads: "But as always, he did check. It met with our approval too." Which is wrong. Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 9:28
  • Thanks for the correction.
    – lee
    Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 11:02

2 Answers 2

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This sentence omits an optional "that". It is equivalent to "...he did check that it met with our approval too." Check here means to confirm or verify. For something to meet with a person's approval is another way of saying that the person approves of it.

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It looks like a case of omitting the subordinator "that":

he did check that it met with our approval too..

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