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The weather segment on the TV news from a production of TVOntario. Produced in association with Television Language Training Inc. in co-operation with Canada Employment and Immigration Commission. (12CDS) To view A 24 minute sample of this video go to: https://youtube.com/watch?v=IaYSVoJoqIE

Weatherman: Good evening ladies and gentlemen. Here is today's weather forecast. It's not very good; I'm afraid there's a storm coming up.

Man: Oh, you said, you predicted there would be sunshine for the rest of the week.

Weatherman: Well, you can never be sure what's going to happen anyway. Don't interrupt. As I was saying, there is a storm coming up because there is warm air moving from the south which is meeting cold air from the north.

Man: So, that's why we have storms. Warm air is meeting cold air?

Weatherman: Yes. As I was saying... what was I saying?

Man: You were talking about the storm.

Weatherman: Oh, oh, yes. There's a nasty storm coming, I'm afraid.

Man: Which means that it'll be stormy and windy and rainy with lots of thunder and lightning?

Weatherman: Yes. Cloudy, rainy, windy, with lots of thunder and lightning. Would you sit down? Who's doing this weather forecast, you or me?

Man: You are. You are the weatherman, so take it.

Weatherman: Thank you. And now for today's temperatures.


What does "so take it" mean in this conversation?

Does it mean "so continue"?

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  • Source of this conversation. (it looks very odd for a real news anchor to be this rude in public) Perhaps there is humour that doens't come across in the transcript. But Please Cite your Sources
    – James K
    Jan 15, 2021 at 23:28
  • Hi James. If you like I can send you all the text files via email. Jan 16, 2021 at 10:10
  • What text files? Where did these text files come from? a teacher? the internet? Sending them to me by email is no good because they are still not cited.
    – James K
    Jan 16, 2021 at 10:17
  • This is a production of TVOntario. Produced in association with Television Language Training Inc. in co-operation with Canada Employment and Immigration Commission. (12CDS) To view A 24 minute sample of this video go to: youtube.com/watch?v=IaYSVoJoqIE&feature=youtu.be Jan 16, 2021 at 10:44
  • Perfect! Thanks!
    – James K
    Jan 16, 2021 at 10:54

1 Answer 1

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"So take it" here means "take the focus in this TV presentation; I will be quiet now". There used to be a BBC (British) radio show in the 1950s called "Take It From Here" which consisted of a sequence of comedy sketches. In a radio studio, the actors had headphones and the programme producer might say "Jimmy, take it from here" to an individual, meaning "Your act starts now, Jimmy". This gave rise to the title. In general, "Take it (now, from here, etc)" is used when it is desired to hand a task, function, or role from one person, team, etc, to another. If I see a colleague is struggling with a task, or needs a break, or if it is my turn to do it, I might say "I'll take it from here" to them.

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