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I'd like to know whether I should use "their" or "whose" in the following. And why should I use one over the other?

Those politicians, whose hands seem to be made to take bribes, and their/whose lips to tell lies, should be imprisoned till they die.

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  • Those politicians, their lips to tell lies, should be imprisoned till they die. would make no sense Jan 19, 2021 at 2:32
  • No grammatical sense, especially. Do you think "whose" is correct? What about replacing "and their lips" in the original with "with their lips"?
    – Apollyon
    Jan 19, 2021 at 2:34
  • "Those politicians, whose hands seem to be made to take bribes, with their lips to tell lies, should be imprisoned till they die."
    – Apollyon
    Jan 19, 2021 at 2:35
  • It would break the pattern if you added "with", I am afraid... "[with] their lips ([that] [seem to be made]) to tell lies" Jan 19, 2021 at 2:48
  • "with their lips (constantly/shamelessly/tirelessly) telling lies" might work... Although I would stick to "whose" to employ repetition and to seamlessly connect it the previous clause Jan 19, 2021 at 2:56

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I think either one is acceptable. Using 'whose' would reuse the word from the first phrase; if you think repetition sounds better, it's there for you. If you don't want to repeat, you have a perfectly good substitute.

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  • Using "their" would raise the issue of paralelism.
    – Apollyon
    Jan 20, 2021 at 1:03

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