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Can I use the word "will" in two clauses of the same sentence that starts with "when"? I've already checked all questions in this forum about the use of "will" twice in a sentence, but none of them specifically mentioned this case. Here's an example:

When the angel of death will come, none will be able to evade him.

The person who says this is clearly making a prediction about the coming of the angel. However, I'm not sure whether the sentence should be:

When the angel of death comes, none will be able to evade him.

Are both sentences correct? If so, do they have the same meaning?

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When the angel of death will come, none will be able to evade him.

Is perfectly correct, but very old fashioned. If written today, I would suspect that the author was imitating the style and diction of a much older source, probably the King James Version of the Bible. I would not write this, and I would not advise writing it except with the intent of imitating a now obsolete style.

That said, there is no numerical limit on the number of clauses that use "will", if each one uses it properly.

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When the angel of death will come, none will be able to evade him.

is not correct. Please see the links in @FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica's comment.

If the angel of death comes, none will be able to evade him. (=a weaker form, the angel might or might not come)

When the angel of death comes, none will be able to evade him. (=a stronger from, the angel will come)

Note how when stresses the speaker's certainty. They are sure that the event will happen.

You can express it by using 2 sentences.

The angel of death will come. [When he does,] None will be able to evade him.

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