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Is the former like there were a few days where a single shooting star appeared? And is the latter like there were a few days where one or more than one shooting stars appeared?

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    Does this answer your question? "many a time" means "many times"? Both mean the same thing with slightly different nuances. As for the number of days, there is not enough context. Jan 22, 2021 at 12:40
  • @niamulbengali The answers from your link say "many a time = many times", so then if I see 3 shooting stars three days in a row (9 in total), would I still be able to say it like "I've seen many a shooting star lately"?
    – dolco
    Jan 22, 2021 at 12:48
  • Many a <singular noun> means many <plural noun>. Let us consider anything more than five shooting stars many shooting stars. Then if you have recently seen nine, on three separate days, you would say, I have seen many a shooting star lately and it would be grammatical as well as semantically correct. However, "lately" refers to recent times. So if you said this a year later, it might be incorrect. Your original sentences say nothing in particular about the distribution of the sightings. You should say I've seen many a star/meteor shower lately to be more precise about different days. Jan 22, 2021 at 12:51
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    It would be much more idiomatic to say "I've seen many" or "a lot of shooting stars lately." As the comments on the other question say, many a is a rather old-fashioned usage - many a time is probably the most common expression. You might say "I've seen many a shooting star" if you were thinking back over the times you had seen one in your whole life. Jan 22, 2021 at 14:18

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