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In this sentence:

Looking towards our goal of reaching a better performance, we will use more efficient strategies.

Would to reach be more correct in this context, or are the expressions goal of doing and goal to do always interchangeable? Is there any distinction between the two uses?

I found instances of both on the internet:

In 1961, President Kennedy set a goal to reach the moon "before this decade is out". (Ludwig)

and

Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced he was “setting the goal” of reaching 100,000 tests for coronavirus per day by the end of April. (Somerset Live)

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    See how the two constructions have competed over time: books.google.com/ngrams/… – Ronald Sole Jan 22 at 12:54
  • @RonaldSole: So I should go with "goal of reaching" because it is more frequently used? Is that the only difference? – fev Jan 22 at 13:18
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    Either way is fine. – maxbear123 Jan 22 at 13:49
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    @RonaldSole On the other hand, if you just look for "goal of/goal to", the results look very different: books.google.com/ngrams/… – stangdon Jan 22 at 15:38
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Considering the example above:

Looking towards our goal of reaching a better performance, we will use more efficient strategies.

This seems to be an example of the passive voice. It makes sense and you can totally say it without sounding weird, but it does feel a little high-brow. One could change it to be "...towards our goal to reach better performance..." and subjectively convey the speaker's greater stake in achieving the goal.

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  • I didn't quite catch the difference between the two. Could you be more specific? – fev Jan 23 at 9:09
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Both are correct and used interchangeably.

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